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An Assortment Of Items That You May Enjoy. Say hello at malcolm78 {at} gmail.com.

—Malcolm Johnson // Metchosin, B.C.

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MJ

Give up for good the long and straggling way of life, press onward on the northern track, step by step advance along the upward road, as the sun skirts along the western mountains.

- Kerouac in Wake Up

—Jim James

I feel like our generation got sold the biggest fucking crock of bullshit that in order to be an artist, you have to be fucking miserable, especially Kurt Cobain. I loved Nirvana growing up and I still value their music and I feel bad for him for being miserable because I wish he would have had a happy life. But he perpetuated this myth that, in order to be successful, you’ve got to be shooting heroin, you’ve got to be a fucking miserable person. And I grew up buying into that and believing that. Even some of our great heroes like Neil Young and Bob Dylan project a lot of darkness and shit. But then you listen to Curtis Mayfield or Stevie Wonder or Bruce Springsteen and you see these brilliant artists projecting hope, [saying] we’re in this together.

—Jim James in Rolling Stone

HOBO SURF SIGNS.
—via Kook Magazine

HOBO SURF SIGNS.

—via Kook Magazine

jeremykoreski:

Look out

jeremykoreski:

Look out


(via jeremykoreski)
"My epiphany was the ascent, with a Boy Scout troop, of Mt. Olympus in Washington, where I became more aware of the ceaseless interplay of earth-shaping forces and the techniques of ascending a shining, crevassed glacier. Another of my first wilderness experiences was an ascent of Mt. Triumph, an isolated rock horn in the North Cascades. While standing on the summit and surveying the surroundings with a sense of awe, I felt a kinship with the noble, almost unbelievable peaks and tumbling glaciers."
—via The Cleanest Line

"My epiphany was the ascent, with a Boy Scout troop, of Mt. Olympus in Washington, where I became more aware of the ceaseless interplay of earth-shaping forces and the techniques of ascending a shining, crevassed glacier. Another of my first wilderness experiences was an ascent of Mt. Triumph, an isolated rock horn in the North Cascades. While standing on the summit and surveying the surroundings with a sense of awe, I felt a kinship with the noble, almost unbelievable peaks and tumbling glaciers."

—via The Cleanest Line

—The Flood of ‘57